WFSTL Releases Women in the Workplace Report

WFSTL Releases Women in the Workplace Report

 

New Publication Highlights Best

 Practices from 13 Organizations Demonstrating a Strong Commitment to Gender Equity  

Today, on Equal Pay Day, the Women’s Foundation of Greater St. Louis (WFSTL) has released a report on the results from its second annual Women in the Workplace: Employment Scorecard initiative, which evaluates employment practices of organizations in the St. Louis region. The “Scorecard” is the area’s only initiative incentivizing and educating employers to cultivate a gender diverse workforce. This year, WFSTL is recognizing 13 St. Louis employers that demonstrated excellence in four areas of workplace gender equity – leadership, compensation, flexible work policies, and recruitment and retention.

 

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Seeking Solutions Symposium Follow Up Report on Period Poverty in St. Louis

Seeking Solutions Symposium Follow Up Report on Period Poverty in St. Louis

 “Period Poverty” and St. Louis Women

A recent report, led by St. Louis University associate professor Dr. Anne Sebert Kuhlmann, found that 64% of low-income St. Louis women occasionally struggle with affording menstrual products such as pads or tampons, and 20% of those women stated that they struggle with this on a monthly basis.  This phenomenon is often referred to as “period poverty.” 

Period Poverty impacts women in a wide variety of ways – those who are experiencing economic insecurity are often left to make the difficult decision of paying for food for their families or menstrual products.  To further complicate this issue, Missouri is one many states with what is referred to as a “tampon tax,” meaning menstrual products are taxed as “luxury items” rather than as necessities which are not as heavily taxed.  Because these products are not recognized as necessities, government-assistance programs do not cover the costs for them.  The cost of menstruation often leaves many women with no choice but to use alternatives such as paper towels and rags in place of commercial products, and even miss days of work at a time when those alternatives are inadequate.

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